Guide to the Secure Configuration of Red Hat Enterprise Linux CoreOS 4

with profile DRAFT - BSI APP.4.4. and SYS.1.6
This profile defines a baseline that aligns to the BSI (Federal Office for Security Information) IT-Grundschutz Basic-Protection. This baseline implements OS-Level configuration requirements from the following sources: - Building-Block SYS.1.6 Containerisation - Building-Block APP.4.4 Kubernetes THIS DOES NOT INCLUDE REQUIREMENTS FOR A HARDENED LINUX FROM SYS.1.3 LINUX
This guide presents a catalog of security-relevant configuration settings for Red Hat Enterprise Linux CoreOS 4. It is a rendering of content structured in the eXtensible Configuration Checklist Description Format (XCCDF) in order to support security automation. The SCAP content is is available in the scap-security-guide package which is developed at https://www.open-scap.org/security-policies/scap-security-guide.

Providing system administrators with such guidance informs them how to securely configure systems under their control in a variety of network roles. Policy makers and baseline creators can use this catalog of settings, with its associated references to higher-level security control catalogs, in order to assist them in security baseline creation. This guide is a catalog, not a checklist, and satisfaction of every item is not likely to be possible or sensible in many operational scenarios. However, the XCCDF format enables granular selection and adjustment of settings, and their association with OVAL and OCIL content provides an automated checking capability. Transformations of this document, and its associated automated checking content, are capable of providing baselines that meet a diverse set of policy objectives. Some example XCCDF Profiles, which are selections of items that form checklists and can be used as baselines, are available with this guide. They can be processed, in an automated fashion, with tools that support the Security Content Automation Protocol (SCAP). The DISA STIG, which provides required settings for US Department of Defense systems, is one example of a baseline created from this guidance.
Do not attempt to implement any of the settings in this guide without first testing them in a non-operational environment. The creators of this guidance assume no responsibility whatsoever for its use by other parties, and makes no guarantees, expressed or implied, about its quality, reliability, or any other characteristic.

Profile Information

Profile TitleDRAFT - BSI APP.4.4. and SYS.1.6
Profile IDxccdf_org.ssgproject.content_profile_bsi

CPE Platforms

  • cpe:/o:redhat:enterprise_linux_coreos:4

Revision History

Current version: 0.1.73

  • draft (as of 2024-02-22)

Table of Contents

  1. System Settings
    1. SELinux

Checklist

Group   Guide to the Secure Configuration of Red Hat Enterprise Linux CoreOS 4   Group contains 2 groups and 3 rules
Group   System Settings   Group contains 1 group and 3 rules
[ref]   Contains rules that check correct system settings.
Group   SELinux   Group contains 3 rules
[ref]   SELinux is a feature of the Linux kernel which can be used to guard against misconfigured or compromised programs. SELinux enforces the idea that programs should be limited in what files they can access and what actions they can take.

The default SELinux policy, as configured on Red Hat Enterprise Linux CoreOS 4, has been sufficiently developed and debugged that it should be usable on almost any system with minimal configuration and a small amount of system administrator training. This policy prevents system services - including most of the common network-visible services such as mail servers, FTP servers, and DNS servers - from accessing files which those services have no valid reason to access. This action alone prevents a huge amount of possible damage from network attacks against services, from trojaned software, and so forth.

This guide recommends that SELinux be enabled using the default (targeted) policy on every Red Hat Enterprise Linux CoreOS 4 system, unless that system has unusual requirements which make a stronger policy appropriate.

Rule   Ensure SELinux Not Disabled in the kernel arguments   [ref]

SELinux can be disabled at boot time by disabling it via a kernel argument. Remove any instances of selinux=0 from the kernel arguments in that file to prevent SELinux from being disabled at boot.
Rationale:
Disabling a major host protection feature, such as SELinux, at boot time prevents it from confining system services at boot time. Further, it increases the chances that it will remain off during system operation.
Severity: 
medium
Rule ID:xccdf_org.ssgproject.content_rule_coreos_enable_selinux_kernel_argument
Identifiers and References

Identifiers:  CCE-83899-5

References:  APP.4.4.A4, 1, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, APO01.06, APO11.04, APO13.01, BAI03.05, DSS01.05, DSS03.01, DSS05.02, DSS05.04, DSS05.05, DSS05.07, DSS06.02, DSS06.03, DSS06.06, MEA02.01, 3.1.2, 3.7.2, CCI-000022, CCI-000032, 164.308(a)(1)(ii)(D), 164.308(a)(3), 164.308(a)(4), 164.310(b), 164.310(c), 164.312(a), 164.312(e), 4.2.3.4, 4.3.3.2.2, 4.3.3.3.9, 4.3.3.4, 4.3.3.5.1, 4.3.3.5.2, 4.3.3.5.3, 4.3.3.5.4, 4.3.3.5.5, 4.3.3.5.6, 4.3.3.5.7, 4.3.3.5.8, 4.3.3.6.1, 4.3.3.6.2, 4.3.3.6.3, 4.3.3.6.4, 4.3.3.6.5, 4.3.3.6.6, 4.3.3.6.7, 4.3.3.6.8, 4.3.3.6.9, 4.3.3.7.1, 4.3.3.7.2, 4.3.3.7.3, 4.3.3.7.4, 4.3.4.4.7, 4.4.2.1, 4.4.2.2, 4.4.2.4, 4.4.3.3, SR 1.1, SR 1.10, SR 1.11, SR 1.12, SR 1.13, SR 1.2, SR 1.3, SR 1.4, SR 1.5, SR 1.6, SR 1.7, SR 1.8, SR 1.9, SR 2.1, SR 2.10, SR 2.11, SR 2.12, SR 2.2, SR 2.3, SR 2.4, SR 2.5, SR 2.6, SR 2.7, SR 2.8, SR 2.9, SR 3.1, SR 3.5, SR 3.8, SR 4.1, SR 4.3, SR 5.1, SR 5.2, SR 5.3, SR 7.1, SR 7.6, A.10.1.1, A.11.1.4, A.11.1.5, A.11.2.1, A.12.1.1, A.12.1.2, A.12.4.1, A.12.4.2, A.12.4.3, A.12.4.4, A.12.7.1, A.13.1.1, A.13.1.2, A.13.1.3, A.13.2.1, A.13.2.2, A.13.2.3, A.13.2.4, A.14.1.2, A.14.1.3, A.6.1.2, A.7.1.1, A.7.1.2, A.7.3.1, A.8.2.2, A.8.2.3, A.9.1.1, A.9.1.2, A.9.2.1, A.9.2.3, A.9.4.1, A.9.4.4, A.9.4.5, CIP-003-8 R5.1.1, CIP-003-8 R5.3, CIP-004-6 R2.2.3, CIP-004-6 R2.3, CIP-007-3 R5.1, CIP-007-3 R5.1.2, CIP-007-3 R5.2, CIP-007-3 R5.3.1, CIP-007-3 R5.3.2, CIP-007-3 R5.3.3, AC-3, AC-3(3)(a), DE.AE-1, ID.AM-3, PR.AC-4, PR.AC-5, PR.AC-6, PR.DS-5, PR.PT-1, PR.PT-3, PR.PT-4, SRG-APP-000233-CTR-000585

Rule   Configure SELinux Policy   [ref]

The SELinux targeted policy is appropriate for general-purpose desktops and servers, as well as systems in many other roles. To configure the system to use this policy, add or correct the following line in /etc/selinux/config:
SELINUXTYPE=targeted
       
Other policies, such as mls, provide additional security labeling and greater confinement but are not compatible with many general-purpose use cases.
Rationale:
Setting the SELinux policy to targeted or a more specialized policy ensures the system will confine processes that are likely to be targeted for exploitation, such as network or system services.

Note: During the development or debugging of SELinux modules, it is common to temporarily place non-production systems in permissive mode. In such temporary cases, SELinux policies should be developed, and once work is completed, the system should be reconfigured to targeted.
Severity: 
medium
Rule ID:xccdf_org.ssgproject.content_rule_selinux_policytype
Identifiers and References

Identifiers:  CCE-82532-3

References:  APP.4.4.A4, 1, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, APO01.06, APO11.04, APO13.01, BAI03.05, DSS01.05, DSS03.01, DSS05.02, DSS05.04, DSS05.05, DSS05.07, DSS06.02, DSS06.03, DSS06.06, MEA02.01, 3.1.2, 3.7.2, CCI-002165, CCI-002696, 164.308(a)(1)(ii)(D), 164.308(a)(3), 164.308(a)(4), 164.310(b), 164.310(c), 164.312(a), 164.312(e), 4.2.3.4, 4.3.3.2.2, 4.3.3.3.9, 4.3.3.4, 4.3.3.5.1, 4.3.3.5.2, 4.3.3.5.3, 4.3.3.5.4, 4.3.3.5.5, 4.3.3.5.6, 4.3.3.5.7, 4.3.3.5.8, 4.3.3.6.1, 4.3.3.6.2, 4.3.3.6.3, 4.3.3.6.4, 4.3.3.6.5, 4.3.3.6.6, 4.3.3.6.7, 4.3.3.6.8, 4.3.3.6.9, 4.3.3.7.1, 4.3.3.7.2, 4.3.3.7.3, 4.3.3.7.4, 4.3.4.4.7, 4.4.2.1, 4.4.2.2, 4.4.2.4, 4.4.3.3, SR 1.1, SR 1.10, SR 1.11, SR 1.12, SR 1.13, SR 1.2, SR 1.3, SR 1.4, SR 1.5, SR 1.6, SR 1.7, SR 1.8, SR 1.9, SR 2.1, SR 2.10, SR 2.11, SR 2.12, SR 2.2, SR 2.3, SR 2.4, SR 2.5, SR 2.6, SR 2.7, SR 2.8, SR 2.9, SR 3.1, SR 3.5, SR 3.8, SR 4.1, SR 4.3, SR 5.1, SR 5.2, SR 5.3, SR 7.1, SR 7.6, A.10.1.1, A.11.1.4, A.11.1.5, A.11.2.1, A.12.1.1, A.12.1.2, A.12.4.1, A.12.4.2, A.12.4.3, A.12.4.4, A.12.7.1, A.13.1.1, A.13.1.2, A.13.1.3, A.13.2.1, A.13.2.2, A.13.2.3, A.13.2.4, A.14.1.2, A.14.1.3, A.6.1.2, A.7.1.1, A.7.1.2, A.7.3.1, A.8.2.2, A.8.2.3, A.9.1.1, A.9.1.2, A.9.2.1, A.9.2.3, A.9.4.1, A.9.4.4, A.9.4.5, CIP-003-8 R5.1.1, CIP-003-8 R5.2, CIP-003-8 R5.3, CIP-004-6 R2.2.3, CIP-004-6 R2.3, CIP-004-6 R3.3, CIP-007-3 R5.1, CIP-007-3 R5.1.2, CIP-007-3 R5.2, CIP-007-3 R5.3.1, CIP-007-3 R5.3.2, CIP-007-3 R5.3.3, CIP-007-3 R6.5, AC-3, AC-3(3)(a), AU-9, SC-7(21), DE.AE-1, ID.AM-3, PR.AC-4, PR.AC-5, PR.AC-6, PR.DS-5, PR.PT-1, PR.PT-3, PR.PT-4, SRG-OS-000445-GPOS-00199, SRG-APP-000233-CTR-000585, BP28(R46), BP28(R64), 1.2.6

Rule   Ensure SELinux State is Enforcing   [ref]

The SELinux state should be set to enforcing at system boot time. In the file /etc/selinux/config, add or correct the following line to configure the system to boot into enforcing mode:
SELINUX=enforcing
       
Rationale:
Setting the SELinux state to enforcing ensures SELinux is able to confine potentially compromised processes to the security policy, which is designed to prevent them from causing damage to the system or further elevating their privileges.
Severity: 
high
Rule ID:xccdf_org.ssgproject.content_rule_selinux_state
Identifiers and References

Identifiers:  CCE-82531-5

References:  APP.4.4.A4, 1, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, APO01.06, APO11.04, APO13.01, BAI03.05, DSS01.05, DSS03.01, DSS05.02, DSS05.04, DSS05.05, DSS05.07, DSS06.02, DSS06.03, DSS06.06, MEA02.01, 3.1.2, 3.7.2, CCI-001084, CCI-002165, CCI-002696, 164.308(a)(1)(ii)(D), 164.308(a)(3), 164.308(a)(4), 164.310(b), 164.310(c), 164.312(a), 164.312(e), 4.2.3.4, 4.3.3.2.2, 4.3.3.3.9, 4.3.3.4, 4.3.3.5.1, 4.3.3.5.2, 4.3.3.5.3, 4.3.3.5.4, 4.3.3.5.5, 4.3.3.5.6, 4.3.3.5.7, 4.3.3.5.8, 4.3.3.6.1, 4.3.3.6.2, 4.3.3.6.3, 4.3.3.6.4, 4.3.3.6.5, 4.3.3.6.6, 4.3.3.6.7, 4.3.3.6.8, 4.3.3.6.9, 4.3.3.7.1, 4.3.3.7.2, 4.3.3.7.3, 4.3.3.7.4, 4.3.4.4.7, 4.4.2.1, 4.4.2.2, 4.4.2.4, 4.4.3.3, SR 1.1, SR 1.10, SR 1.11, SR 1.12, SR 1.13, SR 1.2, SR 1.3, SR 1.4, SR 1.5, SR 1.6, SR 1.7, SR 1.8, SR 1.9, SR 2.1, SR 2.10, SR 2.11, SR 2.12, SR 2.2, SR 2.3, SR 2.4, SR 2.5, SR 2.6, SR 2.7, SR 2.8, SR 2.9, SR 3.1, SR 3.5, SR 3.8, SR 4.1, SR 4.3, SR 5.1, SR 5.2, SR 5.3, SR 7.1, SR 7.6, A.10.1.1, A.11.1.4, A.11.1.5, A.11.2.1, A.12.1.1, A.12.1.2, A.12.4.1, A.12.4.2, A.12.4.3, A.12.4.4, A.12.7.1, A.13.1.1, A.13.1.2, A.13.1.3, A.13.2.1, A.13.2.2, A.13.2.3, A.13.2.4, A.14.1.2, A.14.1.3, A.6.1.2, A.7.1.1, A.7.1.2, A.7.3.1, A.8.2.2, A.8.2.3, A.9.1.1, A.9.1.2, A.9.2.1, A.9.2.3, A.9.4.1, A.9.4.4, A.9.4.5, CIP-003-8 R5.1.1, CIP-003-8 R5.2, CIP-003-8 R5.3, CIP-004-6 R2.2.3, CIP-004-6 R2.3, CIP-004-6 R3.3, CIP-007-3 R5.1, CIP-007-3 R5.1.2, CIP-007-3 R5.2, CIP-007-3 R5.3.1, CIP-007-3 R5.3.2, CIP-007-3 R5.3.3, CIP-007-3 R6.5, AC-3, AC-3(3)(a), AU-9, SC-7(21), DE.AE-1, ID.AM-3, PR.AC-4, PR.AC-5, PR.AC-6, PR.DS-5, PR.PT-1, PR.PT-3, PR.PT-4, SRG-OS-000445-GPOS-00199, SRG-OS-000134-GPOS-00068, BP28(R37), BP28(R79), 1.2.6

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